Activity 1: What does PERCENTAGE mean to me?

What crosses your mind when we talk about PERCENTAGE?

Click at Comments to enter your thoughts...

7 comments:

  1. In British English, percent is usually written as two words (per cent, although percentage and percentile are written as one word). In American English, percent is the most common variant (but cf. per mille written as two words). In EU context the word is always spelled out in one word percent. In the early part of the twentieth century, there was a dotted abbreviation form "per cent.", as opposed to "per cent". The form "per cent." is still in use as a part of the highly formal language found in certain documents like commercial loan agreements (particularly those subject to, or inspired by, common law), as well as in the Hansard transcripts of British Parliamentary proceedings. While the term has been attributed to Latin per centum, this is a pseudo-Latin construction and the term was likely originally adopted from the French pour cent. The concept of considering values as parts of a hundred is originally Greek. The symbol for percent (%) evolved from a symbol abbreviating the Italian per cento. In some other languages, the form prosent is used instead.

    Grammar and style guides often differ as to how percentages are to be written. For instance, it is commonly suggested that the word percent (or per cent) be spelled out in all texts, as in "1 percent" and not "1%." Other guides prefer the word to be written out in humanistic texts, but the symbol to be used in scientific texts. Most guides agree that they always be written with a numeral, as in "5 percent" and not "five percent," the only exception being at the beginning of a sentence: "Ninety percent of all writers hate style guides." Decimals are also to be used instead of fractions, as in "3.5 percent of the gain" and not "3 ½ percent of the gain." It is also widely accepted to use the percent symbol (%) in tabular and graphic material.

    There is no consensus as to whether a space should be included between the number and percent sign in English. Style guides – such as the Chicago Manual of Style – commonly prescribe to write the number and percent sign without any space in between.[1] The International System of Units and the ISO 31-0 standard, on the other hand, require a space.

    ReplyDelete
  2. ratio, discount, savings, profits and losses

    ReplyDelete
  3. File downloading... 0%...10%.... 30%.... 100%...

    ReplyDelete
  4. about ratio and proportion.
    a pictorial view of a chart and the attainment level.

    ReplyDelete
  5. stats - a fraction or part of a figure

    ReplyDelete
  6. Percentage to a 13 year old --- my maths marks and my mum bugging me why I achieved low percentage. I hate it because it does not show my actual performance because I lost 20 marks due to careless errors while I scored full marks in the other segment.

    ReplyDelete